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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
's an fbi investigation that's ongoing and we look to that investigation to give us the definitive word as to what transpired. but putting together the best information that we have available to us today, our current assessment is that what happened in benghazi was, in fact, initially a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired hours before in cairo, almost a copycat of the demonstrations against our facility in cairo, which were prompted, of course, by the video. what we think then transpired in benghazi is that opportunistic extremist elements came to the consulate as this was unfolding. they came with heavy weapons, which unfortunately, are readily available in postrevolutionary libya. and it escalated into a much more violent episode. obviously, that's our best judgment now. we'll await the results of the investigation, and the president has been very clear we'll work with the libyan authorities to bring those responsible to justice. >> was there a failure here that this administration is responsible for, whether it's an intelligence failure, a failure to see this coming, or
. an fbi investigation now under way there. why the two versions? what are you hearing on that? >> reporter: well, they're talking about two different parts of process. on the libyan side of things, they look it from the point of the attack very deliberately in the ways the weapons were used and ammunitions were used. they were evacuated to a safehouse, and the armed gunman proceeded to follow the americans to that safehouse and continue attacking that second location, which was at a very undisclosed area, if you will, away from the embassy or the consulate. the americans are talking more about the protest and the anger that occurred at the moment some of they see gunmen approached. they're not contradicting one another but talking about two different partses of the process. the libyans believe the perpetrators came into the country drawing on the ideology of al qaeda and using the protestors as a cover to attack the u.s. consulate on september 11th. >> what's the situation on the ground right now? >> reporter: well, the situation here remains relatively calm. the people we've been speaking
happened in benghazi, the fbi can't get within 400 miles there to examine the evidence which is already being destroyed, so it's going to be hard to make a case. what about this letter that you have sent asking for answers about what went wrong in benghazi? >> well i have the letter here with me. i could show it to you. i wouldn't change anything. let me be crystal clear as chairman of that committee, and i hope this gets out to other people who are listening about this. >> and i should point out i've got the letter here too. we've gone through it. >> republicans are working overtime to try to exploit a very normal, run of the course, admin strative letter that we agreed to on a bipartisan basis in our committee, simply to get some additional questions put in front of the state department that are part of their already existing investigation. this is not a challenge. it is nothing new. it is not something out of the ordinary. and i agreed to do it as a matter of bipartisanship because we thought these were important questions that people ought to be examining. >> but aren't you concerne
kicks in this a huge way. way leads on to way. suddenly there's the mob and fbi within a year or so. nascar comes out of prohibition. if you follow it even further you get to joe kennedy. joe kennedy made a fair amount of money bringing liquor into the country, legally certainly, and perhaps in some other ways -- i'm not here to cast aspersions. however, by the mid 1950s, the guy's worth half a million dollars, his boy wants to be president, john kennedy's there, money changes hands, john kennedy's in office. we go to the moon. i'm not sure that happens if kerry nation doesn't want into sullivan's. >> johnny, you follow that? >> they didn't teach me that in sixth grade history. >> that's the thing. they leave out the stuff that makes history cool. my dad's an eighth grade social studies teacher for real and it always bugged me that when we look at shows today and ask ourselves why aren't people more jazzed by the fun of this, it's because we've become like a nation of correctors. you know? the guys in the tweed coats with the patches on the sleeves, they're just waiting to hear the
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)